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The Apostles of Jesus: Their Calling, Succession, and Contributions

This page examines the Apostles of Jesus, focusing on the order in which they were called and their most significant contributions to the early Christian movement. The Apostles, as Jesus' closest followers, played a crucial role in the spread of Christianity in the years following his death. This study includes an analysis of the apostolic succession and also the addition of Matthias following the death of Judas Iscariot.

Apostles of Jesus

Introduction

The Apostles of Jesus were twelve men who followed and learned from Jesus during his earthly ministry. Chosen by Jesus himself, they were tasked with the mission of spreading the gospel and establishing the early Christian church. This paper will explore the order in which the Apostles were called, their most important contributions, and the apostolic succession that took place after Judas' death.

 

The Calling of the Apostles

The order in which Jesus called the Apostles is based on accounts found in the New Testament, particularly the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. The chronological order is as follows:

 

1.    Simon (Peter)

2.    Andrew

3.    James (son of Zebedee)

4.    John (son of Zebedee)

5.    Philip

6.    Bartholomew (also known as Nathanael)

7.    Matthew (also known as Levi)

8.    Thomas

9.    James (son of Alphaeus)

10.   Thaddaeus (also known as Lebbaeus or Judas, son of James)

11.    Simon the Zealot

12.    Judas Iscariot

 

The Apostles' Important Contributions

Each Apostle had a unique role in the early Christian church, and their contributions were instrumental in shaping the foundations of Christianity.

 

  1. Peter: As the "rock" upon which the church was built (Matthew 16:18), Peter played a significant role in the early church, notably as a leader and spokesperson for the Apostles.

  2. Andrew: The brother of Peter, Andrew is known for bringing people to Jesus, including his brother and the boy with the loaves and fishes (John 1:40-42, John 6:8-9).

  3. James (son of Zebedee): A prominent figure in the early church, James was the first Apostle to be martyred (Acts 12:2). He was part of Jesus' inner circle, witnessing events such as the Transfiguration and Jesus' agony in Gethsemane.

  4. John (son of Zebedee): Often referred to as "the disciple whom Jesus loved," John authored the Gospel of John, three epistles, and the Book of Revelation. He played a significant role in the early church, providing theological and pastoral guidance.

  5. Philip: Philip is known for evangelizing and baptizing the Ethiopian eunuch (Acts 8:26-40), which marked the expansion of the gospel beyond the Jewish community.

  6. Bartholomew (Nathanael): Though not much is known about his specific contributions, tradition holds that Bartholomew preached the gospel in India and Armenia.

  7. Matthew: As the author of the Gospel of Matthew, he contributed significantly to the early church by providing a written account of Jesus' life, teachings, and ministry.

  8. Thomas: Often called "Doubting Thomas" due to his initial disbelief in Jesus' resurrection, Thomas later made a powerful confession of faith (John 20:24-28). Tradition holds that he preached the gospel in India, where he established churches and was martyred.

  9. James (son of Alphaeus): Little is known about his specific contributions, but he is often identified with James the Less, who was an important figure in the early church in Jerusalem.

  10. Thaddaeus (Lebbaeus or Judas, son of James): Despite limited information on his specific contributions, Thaddaeus is traditionally believed to have preached the gospel in Edessa, Syria, and parts of modern-day Iran and Iraq.

  11. Simon the Zealot: As a member of the Zealot party, Simon was committed to the political and religious freedom of the Jewish people. Tradition holds that he preached the gospel in Persia and was martyred there.

  12. Judas Iscariot: Though ultimately betraying Jesus for thirty pieces of silver, Judas' remorse and subsequent suicide (Matthew 27:3-5) serve as a stark reminder of the consequences of sin and the importance of repentance.

The Apostolic Succession and Matthias

Following the death of Judas Iscariot, the Apostles sought to replace him to maintain the number of twelve, signifying the twelve tribes of Israel. In Acts 1:15-26, the Apostles prayed and cast lots to determine Judas' successor. The lot fell upon Matthias, who was then added to the group of Apostles.  Matthias' most important contribution was his role in maintaining the continuity of the Apostolic ministry. As the replacement for Judas, he was instrumental in ensuring that the ministry of the twelve Apostles continued, helping to establish the early Christian church and spread the gospel.

 

The Inner Circle of Jesus: Contributions of Peter, James, and John

The inner circle of Jesus, comprising Peter, James (son of Zebedee), and John, was a group of Apostles who held a special position of closeness to Jesus during his earthly ministry. They were present at key moments in Jesus' life and played crucial roles in establishing the early Christian church. This page will delve into the individual contributions of these three Apostles, highlighting their unique impact on the growth and development of Christianity.

Peter: The Rock and Leader of the Early Church

 

Peter, originally named Simon, was one of the first disciples called by Jesus and eventually became a central figure in the early Christian church. His most significant contributions include:

 

  • Leadership: Jesus referred to Peter as the "rock" upon which he would build his church (Matthew 16:18), signifying Peter's leadership role in the foundation of Christianity. After Jesus' ascension, Peter emerged as the leader of the Apostles, guiding the early church through its formative years (Acts 1-12).

  • Evangelism: Peter was instrumental in spreading the gospel, starting with his powerful sermon on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:14-41). He also played a vital role in the conversion of Cornelius, a Roman centurion, which marked a turning point in the acceptance of Gentiles into the Christian faith (Acts 10).

  • Authorship: Peter authored two epistles, 1 Peter and 2 Peter, which provided valuable guidance to early Christians facing persecution and challenges in their faith.

James: The First Martyred Apostle

 

James, the son of Zebedee and the brother of John, also held a prominent position in Jesus' inner circle. His most significant contributions include:

 

  • Martyrdom: James was the first Apostle to be martyred for his faith (Acts 12:2). His willingness to die for the gospel served as a testament to the early Christians' conviction and courage in the face of persecution.

  • Witness to Key Events: As part of Jesus' inner circle, James was present at significant events such as the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:1-9), where Jesus was revealed in his divine glory, and the Agony in the Garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36-46), where Jesus prayed before his arrest and crucifixion.

John: The Disciple Whom Jesus Loved

 

John, the son of Zebedee and the brother of James, was the youngest of the Apostles and is often referred to as "the disciple whom Jesus loved." His most significant contributions include:

 

  • Authorship: John authored the Gospel of John, which provides a unique theological perspective on Jesus' life and teachings, as well as three epistles and the Book of Revelation. These texts have greatly influenced Christian theology, piety, and eschatology.

  • Pastoral Care: John is believed to have played a significant role in the early Christian church, providing pastoral care and guidance to believers, particularly in the region of Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey).

  • Witness to Key Events: Like Peter and James, John was part of Jesus' inner circle and was present at important moments in Jesus' life, such as the Transfiguration and the Agony in Gethsemane. Additionally, John was the only Apostle present at the crucifixion of Jesus (John 19:25-27) and was entrusted with the care of Jesus' mother, Mary.

 

The inner circle of Jesus, composed of Peter, James, and John, made significant and lasting contributions to the early Christian church. As key figures in the establishment and growth of Christianity, their leadership, evangelism, and authorship of New Testament texts played a vital role in shaping the faith. Their presence at crucial moments in Jesus' life and their steadfast commitment to spreading the gospel illustrate the profound impact they had on the development of Christianity. The legacy of these three Apostles remains an essential part of the Christian tradition and serves as an inspiration for believers throughout history.

Conclusion

The Apostles of Jesus played a vital role in the formation and growth of the early Christian church. Each Apostle made unique contributions, whether it was through evangelism, leadership, or writing accounts of Jesus' life and teachings. The addition of Matthias after Judas' death further emphasized the importance of maintaining the apostolic ministry, ensuring the continued spread of the gospel and the growth of the Christian faith.

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